456 The House at Pooh Corner. A. A Milne, Alan Alexander: 1882–1956.
The House at Pooh Corner
The House at Pooh Corner
The House at Pooh Corner
The House at Pooh Corner
The House at Pooh Corner
The House at Pooh Corner
The House at Pooh Corner
The House at Pooh Corner
The House at Pooh Corner
The House at Pooh Corner

The House at Pooh Corner

London: Methuen & Co. Ltd., 1928. Ernest H. Shepard. First Edition, First Issue. Crown 8vo, 7 1/2 x 5 in (192 x 127 mm), pp. 178, full-page and text illustrations. Original pink cloth cloth, gilt ruling and stamping on the front board with an illustration of Christopher Robin and Pooh, gilt lettering on spine, top edge gilt, rest uncut; illustrated pink endpapers with panorama and characters in silhouette, with light offset from dust jacket; dust jacket with very slight dust smudging at top edge and spine panel somewhat sunned, else fine.

[Haring-Smith C108; Cutler-Stiles p. 116].

The third of A. A. Milne's charming books for children, The House at Pooh Corner begins with "One day with Pooh Bear had nothing else to do, he thought he would do something, so he went round to Piglet's house to see what Piglet was doing." Some of the chapters had appeared —as early as December 1926— in publications like the Evening News (London), The New York Evening Post and The Charleston (SC). This copy is the FIRST EDITION, with a scarce, near fine dust jacket. It is illustrated with the enchanting drawings of Ernest H. Shepard, whom Milne had met as they both were contributors to Punch. Their collaboration spanned many projects and was fundamental to the success of the series.
On November 28, 1928 the New York Times wrote "The characters could easily come from adult fiction; the world of the forest is a miniature version of the real world." And London's Times Literary Supplement stated "In deciding to close out the Pooh saga, Milne has wisely avoided the temptation to repeat this successful formula mechanically. His books succeed because of their fresh illogic and simplicity. Yet it is sad to see the stories end. The world of 'House at Pooh Corner' is self-contained and so its problems seem more real that those of 'Winnie-the-Pooh'." (13 Dec. 1928, p. 985).

Condition: Near fine / Near fine.

Item number: 456

Price: $4,000.00

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